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What are my limitations after Dallas Mommy Makeover? Dr. Sam Jejurikar at the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute

Tag Archives: tummy tuck

It is common for patients to negotiate an appropriate level of activity after undergoing tummy tuck, breast augmentation, liposuction, or any other combination of surgeries that make up a Dallas mommy makeover.  The thought is, if they can convince me that they need less time to recover than other patients, somehow the surgery will be lessened in magnitude, or that they will be able to recover more quickly after the procedure.

Childbirth takes a dramatic toll on the female body.  To reverse those changes with a mommy makeover, significant surgery is involved.  With a Dallas tummy tuck (abdominoplasty), in addition to removing skin, extensive sculpting of the waist and upper abdomen is performed with liposuction, and the muscles of the abdominal wall are significantly tightened.  Undue straining for a period of time after surgery can disrupt the sutures, and lead to a less then desirable postoperative result.  In addition, straining after surgery can cause problems with wound disruption and bleeding, not to mention prolonged swelling in the abdomen, breasts, and lower extremities.

I usually recommend that my patients take 1-2 weeks off of work after surgery.  Some patients will take less time and others more, depending on the level of physical exertion required at their work place.  I also strongly advise my patients to refrain from any vigorous exercise for 6-8 weeks after surgery.  Although it is important to walk almost immediately after surgery to prevent blood clots and respiratory problems, too much activity can lead to infection, bleeding, and wound healing problems.

Ultimately, to get the best result after mommy makeover, a patient has to allow herself the appropriate amount of time to recover.  Should you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Dr. Jejurikar’s office at 214-827-2814.

Many patients who have lost massive amounts of weight come to the office inquiring about panniculectomy. They have been told by their friends or by other physicians that it is an equivalent operation to tummy tuck (abdominoplasty).

Panniculectomy does have some pleasing effects, but it is not the same thing as an abdominoplasty. With a tummy tuck, the excessive skin of the abdominal wall is removed, the belly button is reshaped, and the abdominal wall is tightened extensively. Oftentimes, liposuction is also performed with this to help provide the patient with a narrower waistline and a more pleasing figure.

Panniculectomy is a functional operation. Specifically, excessive skin located below the belly button is removed as a wedge resection. There is no significant undermining of the skin above the belly button, so patients are still left with a significant amount of redundant skin after this operation. In addition, the belly button is not reshaped, the abdominal wall is not re-tightened, and no liposuction is performed.

Both operations have significant uses, and there is a place for both, but it is important that patients understand the key differences between these procedures.

Should you have any questions about body contouring procedures, contact Dr. Jejurikar at 214-827-2814.

Virtually no patient comes to the office requesting a long scar. In fact, this is the major draw back to abdominoplasty (tummy tuck) surgery for most patients.

Although the scar cannot be eliminated with this operation, Dr. Jejurikar’s goal is to place it in as cosmetically acceptable position as possible. He asks his patients to wear either a bathing suit bottom or an undergarment they would like to be able to wear after surgery, and makes every attempt to design the incision to fall in this location. In addition, he attempts to close the scar as meticulously as possible, leading to as fine a scar as possible. Even with this, in some cases, the scars heal thicker and wider than desired. In these cases, topical medications or corticosteroid injections may be needed to improve the scar. In rare cases, a scar revision in which the scar is excised is required. In some patients, scarring must be treated aggressively for several months to 2 years after the procedure.

Should you have any questions regarding abdominoplasty, the location of the incisions, or scarring, please do not hesitate to contact Dr. Jejurikar at 214-827-2814.

Many patients come to the office inquiring about mini tummy tucks.  The rationale behind this is quite clear.  They would like a smaller scar, and believe that there is very little difference between a mini tummy tuck and a standard tummy tuck.

There are key differences between the operations.  In a mini tummy tuck, there is very little separation of the skin from the abdominal wall muscles, meaning that less skin can be removed.  In addition, there is usually no tightening of the abdominal wall muscles, particularly in the abdominal wall above the belly button.  Therefore, if a patient has upper abdominal bulging or fullness, a mini tummy tuck doesn’t correct it.  Finally, there is no reshaping of the belly button with a mini tummy tuck.

An advantage of a mini tummy tuck, however, is that, given there is less lifting of the skin from the abdominal wall muscle, liposuction of the entire abdominal wall and flanks can be performed much more extensively and much more safely.  This is because there is less chance of wound healing complications.

Ultimately, mini tummy tucks are best for women that have undergone pregnancy and have only small lower abdominal pooches and only minimal to moderate changes to their abdominal wall.  It also can be good for men who have lost large amounts of weight.  For women that have bulging of the upper and lower abdomen with significant excessive skin and stretch marks, a full tummy tuck is almost always a better option.

Should you have additional questions, contact Dr. Jejurikar at 214-827-2814.

Many patients ask if their muscles truly need to be tightened during a tummy tuck.  For most patients, the answer is yes.  After pregnancy or massive weight loss, many women develop a condition known as rectus diastasis.  With this condition, the midline vertical muscles that extend from the sternum and rib cage to the pubic bone, known as the rectus abdominis muscle, separate in the midline.  This leaves a gap that was not present before pregnancy or weight loss.  The gap is not indicative of muscle weakness, but it does lead to an abnormal bulge in the upper abdomen.  As well, it can contribute to an overhanging skin apron in the lower abdomen.

Because this is not indicative of muscle weakness, performing abdominal wall exercises to strengthen the rectus muscles do not considerably improve this.  The only true way to fix the abdominal bulging is to tighten these muscles by bringing them back together in the midline.  As of now, this can only be accomplished with surgery, with the placement of multiple sutures to restore the overall integrity of the abdominal wall.

Obviously, removal of skin and reshaping the belly button are also integral portions of an abdominoplasty (tummy tuck).  For most patients, however, failure to tighten the muscles of the midline abdominal wall would lead to less than optimal results.

For additional questions, please do not hesitate to contact Dr. Jejurikar via the web or via telephone at 214-827-2814.

I’m struck by the number of patients who come in seeking liposuction, but really need abdominoplasty surgery (tummy tuck).  There are important differences between tummy tuck and liposuction, which help determine which procedure is right for you.

During liposuction, a blunt cannula is used to suction fat through multiple tiny incisions. Although many types of liposuction are available, including standard tumescent liposuction, ultrasound liposuction (VASER), power-assisted liposuction, tickle liposuction (vibroliposuction), etc., no skin is removed with any type of liposuction.  The best liposuction candidates maintain a healthy lifestyle and have focal fat deposits not responsive to diet and exercise..  Liposuction is not effective as a means for major weight loss.  Liposuction is not effective in treating skin with stretch marks, which are signs of irreversible skin injury, or muscle looseness, all of which is common after pregnancy or massive weight loss. In fact, in a patient who really needs a tummy tuck, liposuction may worsen the patient’s appearance. However, in patients close to their ideal body weight, without significant stretch marks, liposuction can be highly effective in treating extra fat of the love handles, thighs, back, arms, neck, calves and ankles.

Abdominoplasty (tummy tuck) is usually a far better option for patients who have experienced massive weight loss or multiple pregnancies. Most of these women have extra abdominal skin with stretch marks, and separation of the abdominal wall muscles (rectus diastasis).  The muscle looseness gives the impression of an upper abdominal bulge and a lower abdominal skin apron. These women are great candidates for a tummy tuck, particularly if they are close to their ideal body weight. With removal of the extra abdominal skin, tightening of the abdominal muscles, and reshaping of the belly button, achieving a youthful appearance to the abdomen is often possible!

Questions? Feel free to call 214-827-2814 to schedule an appointment today!

Many patients have asked me if they can smoke cigarettes up to the time of their cosmetic surgery.  The procedures most often in question are breast lifts with or without implants, breast reductions, tummy tucks and facelifts.  Simply put, smoking and these procedures can be recipes for disaster.  I strongly encourage smokers to quit smoking before these surgeries, as tobacco, nicotine, and carbon monoxide, all of which are within cigarettes, can impede wound healing.  In operations which involve lifting and tightening large amounts of skin, this can result in skin separation, or worse yet, skin loss.

Most board-certified plastic surgeons are selective in the procedures that they will offer to tobacco users.  Some procedures that do not require a significant amount of skin lifting, such as rhinoplasty, liposuction and breast augmentation, are thought to be somewhat safer to perform in smokers than procedures that require more skin manipulation.  For that reason, most plastic surgeons will perform these surgeries in smokers, but will still extend significant disclaimers and warnings.

Virtually everyone knows that smoking can cause pulmonary problems, heart disease and lung cancer.  For those reasons alone, I encourage all patients to quit using tobacco products.  In regards to cosmetic surgery, tobacco usage can cause significant problems with healing.  Because cosmetic surgery is elective, it only makes sense to quit tobacco usage prior to surgery to minimize this potential risk.

This is taken directly from a press release from the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery

New York, NY and Arlington Heights, IL – What people find beautiful about themselves may be different than what they find appealing in another person. That’s just one finding from a recent consumer survey conducted on the BeautyforLife website (a joint venture of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery.) Visitors were asked “What aspect of physical beauty do you find most appealing in another person?” In their 20s, 30s, and 40s, respondents look for a fit, well proportioned body; youthful skin ranked at the top for respondents in the 50s and 60s. When considering “Which part of your body are you most concerned about?” respondents ranked their abdomen/hips number one in their 30s. But surprisingly, respondents listed the face, not their body, as the most popular choice in the 20s, 40s, 50s and 60s.

“It is always important to understand what our patients are most concerned about at different stages of their lives. We want to be equipped to help our patients make the right decisions to maintain their beauty at every age—no matter which type of cosmetic medical procedure they are interested in.” said ASAPS President Renato Saltz, MD.

Additional results were revealed when answering “Which part of your body are you most concerned about?” While respondents primarily chose their face, significantly more respondents are concerned about their abdomen/hips than their breasts (chest)—with the disparity increasing throughout the decades:

  1. 30s – 37% chose abdomen/hips as their top concern while only 18% chose breasts
  2. 40s – 32% selected abdomen/hips and only 10% breast
  3. 50s – 25% chose abdomen/hips compared to 7% breast
  4. 60s – 23% indicated concern about their abdomen/hips, while only 7% selected breast

Community members were also asked to consider “The most important reason to maintain your physical appearance.” “To boost self-confidence” was the top choice across all decades, with “To attract potential partners” a close second for the 20s. In the 30s and 40s, the second-most popular choice shifted to “To increase professional opportunities,” which remained the number two choice in the 50s, but by a much smaller percentage. In the 60s, increasing professional opportunities fell to third behind “To help make friends.”

“The survey on the BeautyforLife website has provided interesting data about patients’ attitudes, motivation and perception. Our goal is to provide useful tools for prospective patients to help them first decide if a cosmetic medicine procedure is right for them and then to provide information on how to choose an appropriate provider,” said Dr. Richard D’Amico, past president of ASPS.

Another question asked members to contemplate “The most important factor in maintaining beauty.” While adherence to a healthy diet, regular exercise and skin care were popular choices, approximately one in five members felt that a cosmetic medical procedure was most important in the 50s and 60s.

This survey was conducted by The American Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, via their Beauty for Life program—a series of patient education tools.

About ASPS
The American Society of Plastic Surgeons is the largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons in the world. Representing more than 6,700 physician members, the Society is recognized as a leading authority and information source on cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery. ASPS comprises more than 94 percent of all board-certified plastic surgeons in the United States. Founded in 1931, the Society represents physicians certified by The American Board of Plastic Surgery or The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. For more information, please visit the ASPS website at www.plasticsurgery.org.

Having a child usually is the one of the most magical and emotionally-fulfilling experiences of a woman’s life.  Unfortunately, the physical toll that pregnancy, childbirth and breastfeeding can have on a woman’s body often is devastating. Even with proper diet and exercise, it usually is nearly impossible to restore a youthful, pre-pregnancy body.

Women come in with a litany of complaints, including loosening and bulging of the abdominal wall muscles, stretching and loosening of the skin of the breasts, thighs, and abdomen, and extra fat of the belly, back and thighs.  For those women out there who want a firmer, tighter body, even after childbirth, there is the Mommy Makeover. This cosmetic procedure is individualized for each patient.  One patient may need a breast lift and a tummy tuck; another may opt for liposuction and breast augmentation.  No two patients are the same, so the mommy makeover combines the best of several popular procedures to restore a youthful, pre-pregnancy body.

Through the end of October 2009, we are offering 10% of all surgeon’s fees on breast and body contouring surgery.  Call today (214-827-2814) to schedule a consultation!

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Our Location Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute

9101 N. Central Expwy.
Suite 600, Dallas, TX 75231
Tel: 214.827.2814
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