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Five things to remember about Ebola

Five things to remember about Ebola

Over the last several weeks, the news in Dallas has been dominated by coverage of the Ebola virus. Now that some of initial fear has subsided, it’s time to become truly educated about the Ebola virus, particularly in case a new series of cases emerge in the United States.

Ebola causes hemorrhagic (bleeding) fever and is thought to have originated in bats. Despite the recent attention it has received, Ebola was first discovered almost 40 years. Since its discovery in 1976, the virus has had 5 major outbreaks in West Africa, leading to more than 2700 deaths. Although there has been recent success with experimental treatments in treating patients afflicted with the Ebola virus outside of Africa, as of now, there is no known cure.

First thing to remember: actual infections with Ebola are incredibly rare. Despite assertions otherwise in the media, Ebola is not spread in the air or in water. Ebola can only be spread through direct contact with the body fluids of a person who has the disease.

Second: although the incubation period for the virus is 21 days, it is not contagious during that time. A person has to have a fever and actively be showing symptoms to pass the Ebola virus to another person.

Third: As of today, only 8 patients in the United States have or have had infection with the Ebola virus. Of these patients, only contracted the disease in the United States, both of who were health care workers caring for a patient infected with the Ebola virus who was demonstrating active signs of infection. Also, as of today, only one patient has died in the United States from Ebola. Recovery from the disease comes from supportive care of infected patients and the patient’s immune response. People who recover from Ebola develop antibodies that allow them to fight off the infection for at least 10 years, if not longer.

Four: Symptoms of Ebola are not subtle. They include high fever (greater than 101.5 degrees F), muscle pain, headache, fatigue, diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain and unexplained bleeding. Symptoms usually present 8-10 days after exposure to the body fluids of an infected patient, but can occur anywhere from 2 to 21 days.

Five: It’s important to stratify high risk from low risk exposure to Ebola. High risk comes from needle sticks or mucous membrane (lining of mouth, gums, anus, etc.) exposure to blood or other body fluids without appropriate protective garb. Low risk exposure are brief physical contact to a patient with Ebola (pat on back, hug, shaking hands).

Ebola is a scary disease, there’s no way to sugar coat it. That being said, public fear in the United States has dwarfed the actual magnitude of the problem. It’s important to stay calm and remember the facts, particularly if we are faced with more cases in this country.

Do Botox and injectable filler treatments really have to hurt?

Virtually all patients love their cosmetic treatments with Botox and cosmetic fillers. Who wouldn’t love a quick procedure that can make wrinkles disappear? Unfortunately, many patients don’t love the pain they associate with Botox, Juvederm or Voluma treatments. They hate the feeling of a needle entering their facial skin and this makes them dread their appointments for facial injections. Fear not! There are things your plastic surgeon can do to lessen the pain associated with injections of Botox, Juvederm, Restylane, Voluma or any other filler.

 

Most of these adjunctive treatments rely on the gate control theory of pain to diminish the pain associated with needle sticks. The gate control theory of pain, which was first proposed in 1965 by Ronald Melzack and Patrick Wall, states that non-painful input close the “gates” to painful input, which prevents the sensation of pain from traveling to the central nervous system. When the “gate” to the central nervous system is closed, patients cease to experience pain. In such a manner, stimulation by non-painful input is able to suppress pain.

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One such treatment utilized is the Vibration Anesthesia Device. This device uses vad1vibration to produce a local anesthetic effect, effectively reducing pain associate with needle sticks. During Botox or filler injections, either your injector or an assistant will hold the device directly over the site that will be stuck with a needle. The vibration will stimulate nerve fibers, effectively blocking the painful signal associated with the subsequent injection. Because the signal doesn’t travel to the central nervous system, the patient will experience the vibration sensation but doesn’t experience pain.

 

Another such treatment is ice. The injector will apply an ice pack to the area of injection immediately before the needle stick. Much like the Vibration Anesthesia Device, the ice pack will stimulate nerve fibers that transmit the sensation of cold. This will block the nerve signal transmitted by Botox or filler injection, thereby limiting the sensation of pain.

 

Furthermore, most cosmetic fillers, including Juvederm, Restylane and Voluma have formulations that are pre-mixed with lidocaine. Lidocaine is the most commonly utilized local anesthetic agent used clinically. Because these fillers are pre-mixed with a local anesthetic, as your plastic surgeon injects, your face will gradually numb. This allows subsequent injections to be performed in regions of skin that no longer have sensation. By blocking the sensation experienced by the initial needle stick by using the Vibration Anesthesia Device or an ice pack, and then by utilizing a filler that is pre-mixed with local anesthetic, your treatments can become virtually pain free.

 

To learn more about the Vibration Anesthesia Device, visit the following website. To learn more about ice packs, place some water in your freezer or visit a Northern state in the winter!

 

 

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Our Location Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute

9101 N. Central Expwy.
Suite 600, Dallas, TX 75231
Tel: 214.827.2814
Dallas | Dr. Jejurikar

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